The Colour of Words & Poem to a Leaf, two poems by Josef Lesser

Tell me the colour of words, the rainbow phrases splashed across the daily canvas, like when seagulls skate through lilac clouds and desert crabs hone their calligraphy skills across the burnt sienna sand.


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The Social Dimension of Textual Interrogation in the Classroom, by Jose Jason L. Chancoco

It was Stephen Krashen who pointed out the importance of exposure in the context of second language acquisition-learning. We remember some of our grandparents here in the Philippines who studied under the Thomasites and we marvel at their English proficiency given that some of them did not even finish tertiary education due to the economic and social disruptions brought by the war.


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To make a “Flowry” Death: Rereading Artro Islas, By Andrés Rodríguez

Although a substantial body of criticism has grown up around Arturo Islas’s The Rain God, very little of it deals directly with the subject of indigeneity.2 Most academic readers see the novel as a mixture of elements: history, gender relations, narratology, and so forth. Terms such as “ambiguity,” “alternative,” “hybridity,” and “reconstruction” have been used to describe the complex nature of The Rain God as a “text.”


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The Brain, the Heart, and the Rectum: Humor, Literary Theory and Terror, by Wisam Mansour

Bakhtin, in his theories of the Carnivalesque celebrates among other things the lower strata bodily functions. He believes that one of the spirits of the carnival is to celebrate the low, the banal, the popular as opposed to the classic and mainstream. This Bakhtinian notion brought to my mind a joke in the form of an angry exchange among several parts of the body, brain, heart, lungs, stomach, and rectum, each disputing its right to the leadership of the body: the brain declares its right to lead on the merit of its superior functionality and its capability for reasoning;


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